Have fun storming the castle!

•October 23, 2007 • Leave a Comment


What makes a castle? Sure, you could go on about the logistics of what makes a castle, but then you take the analogy out of everything. Lets just say that to have a castle, you need a gate.

Gate?

Where else have we discussed gates?
University systems.

So when we look at the crisis facing our internet system, we should also think about gates, castles, universities. Let us not forget that with castles come kings, queens, and jesters. The kings come in as the bandwidth bandits in Verizon, Comcast, and ATT, traditionally these places would have been your first choice for TV, long distance, and cell phones, but times they are-a changin.

FFWD to now, from back then, when those companies still held their traditional status. These companies realized they all own the wires, they own the fibers, they own the networks. Why on earth rent space to a company like AOL, Netscape, or MSN when you already OWN those networks, and you can hire people just as good to design platforms that work just as fast. Let’s face it… people shop at Sams Club because of the price, not because it looks pretty. Sure grandma likes starting up the internet and hearing “you’ve got mail”… but most of us don’t even like the idea of ‘starting up’ the internet. It needs to be fast, always on, and unrestricted.

Unrestricted

That’s the problem, unrestricted doesn’t make money. Unrestricted doesn’t allow people to have control over you, The Man doesn’t like that. The Man gets what The Man wants, and The Man wants to make sure you’re not doing anything that keeps money out of The Mans pocket. This is where gatekeepers come into play. Your broadband providers are currently working on deals with congress to control your access. They want to auction off speeds to the highest bidder, and block those that cut into their profits. Is it fair? Why stop there?

“You may have missed it in the fine print of your agreement. Phone companies like Verizon and AT&T reserve the right to block your free speech and terminate your cell phone services “without prior notice and for any reason or no reason.”

Yea.. you didn’t read your TOS (terms of service) did you? You felt that freedom of speech was a given… but these are private companies, private property, and apparently they are not held to the same standards as the government.

Gatekeepers rule the web, they control what goes down the pipe, and out the floodgates into your home. Comcast cutting access to downloading for bittorent is nothing new, they’ve been cutting high bandwidth users for years. Bandwidth throttling is something that has gone on for years, but this is getting press since they singled out a website, instead of the EU (end user).

We’ll see more of this story, but only if you look for it. You have to take stand against these gatekeepers, and send them a message that you won’t allow them to control something they don’t own. They may own the pipeline, but they shouldn’t be allowed to control others content. This situation will affect all users, not just bandwidth hogs. One day you may not be able to access an independant news site, instead being directed to go to CNN.com… all because CNN paid Verizon money to be the only news provider… in fact, you may not even be able to search for topics like ‘Net Neutrality’, simply because they control the flow of information.

All your base are belong to wiki..

•October 1, 2007 • Leave a Comment

So you sit around thinking about what to edit on wikipedia. Sure there are plenty of things, and sure there are mounds of interesting topics, but what are you an expert on?

Fancy yourself the biggest fan of a band?… wiki will own you.
Think you’re a buff on cars?… wiki smokes you.

Oh.. I know… maybe you’re a serious authority on Ninja Gaiden! This should be interesting, because hours and hours of gameplay, surely you know more than most… right?

Again, owned by the Wiki…

So what do you do when you realize you don’t authority to be the authority on anything?
You  find new info not on the wiki, and you add it. That’s the beauty, you don’t have to so much be the authority to write the wiki as such. All you have to do is be able to find the facts, and marry them to the wiki page. So I went hunting for my old HS, and it didn’t say much. At least, not on the surface, looking at the history I saw something that made me smile. If you search for Field High School, you’ll get a page that just gives you the basics, so I added some other info I found from the education dept.

The actual page made me realize that it wasn’t really supposed to be about opinions of the school, or impressions as an alum, it was strictly about information. When I looked at the previous history of the page, it was amusing to see that highschool is always highschool, and kids will be kids.
The kids had taken it over in the begining and wrote humorous slander, wasn’t anything malicious, but it did show a highly juvenile slant. It was funny to see that they were able to write themselves in as the principle, and other such positions. To see them make up stats about people, and all in all do nothing more than Wikraffiti(c) <–( that’s my word feel free to use it).

Obviously I wasn’t just going to add simple stats… had to create a new word.

Homage to a banana man

•September 21, 2007 • Leave a Comment

So a banana walks into a bar

and these two other bananas are sitting at the bar and say “who’s this banana”
and this other banana walks over to group of lady banana’s and says something quiet
The girls go bananas!
So these other two banana’s get to talking, and they can’t figure out what in the banana this guy could have said… and just as they are about to ask him… he says to everyone
“It’s been great guys.. but I gotta split!”

The one banana looks at the other banana and says “what a banana!”

What if we’re all lab mice?

•September 11, 2007 • 1 Comment

Wait… apparently we are!

Click me Click me Click me!!

Who says small doesn’t get the job done?

•September 7, 2007 • Leave a Comment

So you’re thinking of the next blog to read, and there are so many, who’s next?

Do you feel the need to read one based upon it’s humor or it’s truthiness?
Sarcasm, or wit?
How about how long it is?

AHH… there is something that makes it easier, how long it is, surely that is the sign of realvency. Look at bills in congress, and other legal writings, they are always longer than the day they were written, and yet it’s not because they say more, it’s simply because they say it longer. The real point of this is a blog/site called Fark.com

Fark.com is one of the more interesting blogs because it is able to relate news stories in just a couple sentences, and say what we’ll all be thinking by the end. You get the information of what really happened, and then you get their opinion on it. Here is a story that really hits home:

Boston rehearses distribution of bioterror vaccines in case Mooninites lauch another attack

sure… you could go here and read all about the REAL story, but in the end, we’ll all just be thinking of the same thing. For a long time to come, each time we think of Boston and terrorism, we’ll think of the cartoon terrorists. Did you really need to know more about the terror drill than what that headline told you? When I came away from the real article, I didn’t feel as tho I really knew much more than a few extra specifics as to how, and what happened; basically they ran a bioterrorism drill. I got that from the fark headline. Sure there are stories that you want more info on, and thus you will click them and read. OR! In just a small sentence Fark was/is able to sum up what some would write an entire article on. They do it quick, and to the point. No time to mess around, they write what the headlines should be. I’m sure this doesn’t fit the typical blog notion, but just because someone takes a full page to write their ideas, and someone else does it in a sentence… who’s to say they didn’t convey the same idea?

The impotence of proof reading

•September 6, 2007 • 3 Comments

The text of this video can be found here… and appropriately so, as you should read it post haste.

This video is an example of Slam poetry.
It’s a new era spoken word that sometimes will be done in competition, but other times it is just for the art of it. This video is of Taylor Mali, a teacher who was made famous by his slam poem “What Teachers Make“, which is an amazing performance to watch, and I dare you not to be moved by it.

Spoken word poetry often has critics that feel they are rants, they are ongoing, run ons, don’t make sense, and often ramble. They say things in a stream that people feel is to long, and would lose those who were to read it. I feel it is the truest sense of exploring how our brains actually think. Do you have ideas in complete sentences? Does your brain add the correct punctuation between your, and you’re? Or do you think in your voice, in a different language, or even in another persona. Can your brain type faster than your fingers? and can your words mean more than the letters, prepositions, and phrases that you combine to make paragraphs to convey ideas that will somehow be misunderstood. Have you ever handed in a term paper, and even tho you tried so hard to make it make sense to the person that decides what sense is, that if only you had had just a few minuets of face time with that person that decides sense you would have been able to plead your case and explained what you really meant that couldn’t be described on mere paper. Your ideas to big for letters, and your meanings to complex for for the hoards… enter the spoken word. The allowance of your conscience to flow in the liquid form that it has always been and ideas to spring forth like raging rivers in the calm sierra mountains. Text is king on the internet, but there is no escaping the fact that the most powerful form of communicating is with the voice breathing life into the words, giving them the exact meaning, the correct tone, the precision that can only come from the one who thought them. That to me is what spoken word is all about, and to see performances such as this, it shows that you can write a horse to water, but with his mouth shut he will still die of dehydration.

Mother-truckers!

•August 30, 2007 • 4 Comments

 You’re driving down the highway, and are passed by a large semi, and you get angry.  Terms come to mind like climate crisis, global warming, carbon footprints, clean burning diesel? Wait… there’s something wrong… you don’t think of diesel as clean, it’s dirty, and bad for the enviroment, and you’d never be caught dead cashing in that pretty lil prius for a diesel chugging car. Why? Why is it that the rest of the world has embraced diesel technology and we in the US have not? This was the topic discussed in a recent ZDNet blog post about energy consumption.

Already Schaeffer can point to diesel’s higher efficiency as fuel when compared to gasoline. And, he adds, diesel is an earlier distillate when derived from petroleum. Thus it requires less energy and expense to produce. The European Union has long recognized diesel as a more efficient fuel, taxing it at a lower rate than gasoline. The result: last year E.U. new car sales were 50% diesel. In the U.S. that figure was less than 4%. Schaeffer’s confident there’s a diesel surge in America’s future. A combination of new tech and new federal EPA regs will kick in. By 2010 diesel and gas-burning cars and light trucks will have the same mileage and smog standards.

Already Schaeffer can point to diesel’s higher efficiency as fuel when compared to gasoline. And, he adds, diesel is an earlier distillate when derived from petroleum. Thus it requires less energy and expense to produce. The European Union has long recognized diesel as a more efficient fuel, taxing it at a lower rate than gasoline. The result: last year E.U. new car sales were 50% diesel. In the U.S. that figure was less than 4%. Schaeffer’s confident there’s a diesel surge in America’s future. A combination of new tech and new federal EPA regs will kick in. By 2010 diesel and gas-burning cars and light trucks will have the same mileage and smog standards.

Many good points are brought up in the article, biodiesel, and sulfur reduced diesel are only the start. Diesel engines are more efficient, and if you were to look back in the US history, you’ll see during energy crisis, we produce diesel vehicles. As the country starts to realize that it will be very hard to reduce our consumption, we will eventually find ways to reduce the impact of our indulgence. Americans do not want to use less, we just want to use more less impactful products.